Coco, Pixar’s touching movie on human ambitions and values

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“Never underestimate the power of music”

Pixar has never been a kind of production oriented to kids. Ever since it was born, as a spin-off project different from anything else around, Pixar was always able to make movies that children could adore, but appreciated also in a mature and reflective sense by the adult audience. If there is a movie, however, that can be considered as a vision oriented to spectators able to observe the uplifting implications, that is Coco. No robots, monsters, machines or dinosaurs, which, as far as they can be enriched by an important emotional element, still remain close to the typical childish imaginary. The latest Pixar movie is different: the story of a kid, with his dreams and the determination to realize them, in a family context which is compact but characterized by the total ban of music, the breaking element that causes Miguel separation, the dream to be an artist forcing him to move away from the family, albeit temporarily.

From there starts the articulated story, which will see Miguel crossing the boundary between the world of the living and the kingdom of the dead, trying to earn the blessing of the family and go back, passing through different plot twists. And above all, through a long series of particularly moving moments. Obviously for an adult audience, able to feel connected to topics like death, the memory as a mean to maintain and celebrate the bond with our own descent, the respect for family values even when it means sacrificing our dreams, the sense of responsibility in turning our ambitions into something achievable.

Nothing that can sound incomprehensible to children, of course, but the deepest contents of the movie are not always easily recognizable for a young audience. Nevertheless, Coco is a perfect family movie, where the kids can identify themselves in the protagonist and in the pleasure of travelling through different dimensions, gaining the attention of everyone and discovering the surprises that his own family identity reserves. Meanwhile, parents will be silently moved by the story, on a movie that is different from the any other Pixar film seen so far, even though it reuses those perfect mechanisms that touch the emotional chords of the spectators, while managing to snatch an educational smile here and there. It is not simply a film for everybody: It is a movie that can teach something to each of us.

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